Shows & Tickets


This year will mark the Ramona Rodeos’ 37th year in operation. We are proud to offer a TOP NOTCH PRCA rodeo with some of the greatest cowboys around.
Our event boasts the Professional attitude with the BEST hometown hospitality you will find at a rodeo.
All proceeds generated from our rodeo go right back into our BEAUTIFUL non-profit Rodeo Park.
We look forward to opening our gates to you and your family and friends to enjoy our BEAUTIFUL community and our FANTASTIC hometown Rodeo experience.

Featured Acts

Bobby Kerr Mustang Act

Bobby Kerr – Mustang Act

Bobby has been in horse training for over 40 years. He has trained and shown Reining, Roping, Working Cow Horse and Cutting. He is the also Founder of the Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame (TCHF) now located in the Stockyards in Fort Worth, Texas. You may have even seen Bobby and his Mustangs Poncho or Maypop on television since they were on Good Morning America promoting the National Geographic Wild Mini Series Mustang Millionaire on which Bobby was a featured cast member.

Bobby has also collected the following awards and accolades:

  • Fan Favorite in the 2011 Supreme Extreme Mustang Makeover
  • Champion-Legends Division of the 2012 Supreme Extreme Mustang Makeover
  • 2012 Supreme Extreme Mustang Makeover Fan Favorite (Maypop)
  • 2012 IPRA Contract Act Showcase Winner – Dress Class
  • 2013 2nd Place and 3rd Place Winner in the Mustang Million
  • 2015 and 2016, Bobby was nominated in the Top 5 for PRCA Specialty Act of the Year
  • 2016 NFR Specialty Act Winner

Maypop is a six year-old Mustang, captured in Tobin Range, Nevada. After picking up Maypop from Paul’s Valley, Oklahoma and starting the bonding process with him, Bobby became alarmed at the unusual aggressive kicking that Maypop displayed when he was startled by something coming up behind him. Scar tissue in both eyes limited his vision and so he would kick out at anything he was not sure about. That’s how he got his name, because he “may pop ya” if he was startled. Bobby discovered that Maypop was legally blind.  But that hasn’t stopped either of them from performing at the highest levels of the rodeo circuit and collecting awards along the way. In fact, Maypop has become the perfect horse through bonding and the special trust that he developed with Bobby. He is willing and gentle and an special part of the family. Bobby and Maypop won the 2012 Supreme Extreme Mustang Makeover and were voted Fan Favorite.

Rider Kiesner

At age 25, Rider has collected a lifetime of awards including but not limited to:

  • 2X World Champion All-Around Western Performer
  • 4X World Champion Trick Roper
  • 2X World Champion Gun Spinner
  • 5X Wrangler National Finals Rodeo Specialty Act
  • 5X Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo Specialty Act
  • 3X for Dress Act of the Year in the PRCA

He’s performed in 49 States (he has yet to do a show in Hawaii) and 11 Countries including- Canada, Mexico, Japan, China, Oman, Dubai, Lebanon, Hong Kong, South Korea and Taiwan.

Rider grew up as a 5th generation cowboy, competing in youth and Little Britches Rodeos as far back as anyone can remember. He won his first buckle when he was just five years old. He was given a Will Rogers Trick Roping Kit for Christmas when he was 9 years old. Rider pushed the living room furniture back and watched the instructional video over and over until he had mastered each trick. He started performing locally and began performing in professional rodeo by the time he was 11 years old. Rider continues to practice Cowboy skills of trick roping, guns spinning and whip-cracking. In the early days of rodeo, trick-roping was held as a competition at most of the biggest rodeos in the nation. Rider competes at the nations’ largest competitions for trick-roping and gun-spinning.  Come out to the Ramona Rodeo and see Rider perform!

Rider Kiesner
Professional Rodeo Announcer – Bob Edmonds

Professional Rodeo Announcer – Bob Edmonds

With a lifetime of experience in the rodeo arena, Bob Edmonds is one of the most knowledgeable announcers in the business. Growing up in a stock contracting family, Bob learned early on the value of a good rodeo production. He has been involved in nearly every aspect of rodeo, but announcing and sharing his passion for rodeo is what Bob thoroughly enjoys. Bob has been announcing rodeos since 2001 and he earned his Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) card at the beginning of the 2006 season. His smooth, authentic and enthusiastic delivery of the rodeo events will keep even the most seasoned rodeo fan involved and entertained, all in a family friendly atmosphere.

Bob has been selected four times to announce the prestigious Ram Mountain States PRCA Circuit Finals Rodeo. He keeps a busy schedule each year of announcing PRCA rodeos and PRCA Xtreme Bull Riding, in addition to a handful of PBR Touring Pro bull ridings. His impressive rodeo resume also includes several regional rodeo finals, college rodeos, bull ridings and rough stock events.

Not only does Bob’s professionalism inside the arena standout, but his work outside the arena does as well. Bob is a Colorado Licensed Land Surveyor and owns and operates a successful Land Surveying firm in Northern Colorado. His first passion however is his family. Bob and his wife Brandy, have twin daughters, Kaycee and Koree, and travel as a family to many of their events. Brandy can also be found operating the sound and music at many rodeos, herself being selected four times to work the Ram Mountain States Circuit Finals Rodeo. The Edmonds live near Kersey, CO and in addition to rodeo, they enjoy riding their horses, team roping and many outdoor activities from golf to hunting.

Honeycutt Rodeo Company

It’s a Family Tradition for Honeycutt Rodeo Contractors

Since grandpa Walt produced his first rodeo back in 1953 to present day, the Honeycutt Rodeo Contractors span generations as pioneers in the rodeo business. This rodeo-loving family heritage has earned the Honeycutts national stature.  They’ve been awarded some of the most prestigious honors that this industry bestows including when Grandpa Walt won:

  • The 1981 International Rodeo Fans’ Man of the Year
  • 1986 PRCA Stock Contractor of the Year
  • Induction into the Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame in 1990
  • The Cowboy Hall of Fame in 2009

Roy Honeycutt continued the tradition and extended the business to include some of the best stock in the rodeo business raised on his ranch in Colorado. World champion horse breeding and bull breeding programs are happening for the Honeycutts these days while continuing their strong foundation in national rodeo competition contracting. In 2010, Honeycutt Rodeo was proud to receive:

  • The Family Heritage Award from The WPRA

Today, Jerry Honeycutt credits his dad, Roy, for teaching him how to put on a top notch, fast-paced and high quality professional rodeo. And he’s honored to carry on his grand dad’s dream of professional rodeo two generations later. Jerry said, “I look forward to carrying on the tradition of producing top notch rodeos and cannot wait to see what the next 60 years holds for Honeycutt Rodeo.”

Honeycutt Rodeo Company

I want to come to the Rodeo… what can I expect to see?

Bareback Riding

Bareback Riding

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Bareback Riding

Bareback riding, developed in the rodeo arena many years ago, consistently produces some of the wildest action in the sport. A bareback rider begins his ride with no saddle, seated on the bronc’s back and with his feet placed above the break of the horse’s shoulder. If the cowboy’s feet are not in the correct position when the horse hits the ground on its first jump out of the chute, the cowboy has failed to “mark out” the horse properly and is disqualified. Throughout the eight second ride, the cowboy must grasp the rigging (a handhold made of leather and rawhide) with only one hand. A rider is disqualified if he touches his equipment, himself or the animal with his free hand or bucks off. The rider is judged on his control during the ride and on his spurring technique. The score also is based on the rider’s “exposure” to the strength of the horse. In addition, the horse’s performance accounts for half the potential score.
Tie-down Roping

Tie-Down Roping

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Tie-Down Roping

Like bronc riding, tie down roping is an event born on the ranches of the Old West. Sick calves were roped and tied down for medical treatment. Today, success in tie down roping depends largely on the teamwork between a cowboy and his horse. After the calf is given a head start, horse and rider give chase. The contestant ropes the calf, then dismounts and runs to the animal. After catching and flanking the calf, the cowboy ties any three of the animal’s legs together using a “pigging string” he carries in his teeth until needed. if the calf is not standing when the contestant reaches it, the cowboy must allow the animal to stand before setting it down to tie three legs. When the cowboy completes his tie, he throws his hands in the air as a signal to judge. He then remounts and allows the rope attached to his saddle to become slack. Note how the horse is very careful in keeping the rope just right, not too much slack or too tight until the cowboy mounts up again. The run is declared invalid if the calf kicks free of the ties within six seconds. As with any timed event, a 10 second penalty is added if the roper does not allow the calf the proper head start out into the arena ahead of him – this is known as “breaking the barrier.”
Saddle bronc riding

Saddle Bronc Riding

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Saddle Bronc Riding

Rodeo’s “classic” event, saddle bronc riding, has roots that run deep in the history of the Old West. Ranch hands would often gather and compete among themselves to see who could display the best style while riding untrained horses. It was from this early competition that today’s event was born. Each rider has a small saddle on the horse and must begin his ride out of the chute with his feet over the bronc’s shoulder to give the horse the advantage. A rider who synchronizes his spurring action with the animal’s bucking efforts will receive a high score. Other factors considered in the scoring are the cowboy’s control throughout the ride, the length of his spurring stroke and how hard the horse bucks. Disqualification results if, prior to the buzzer which sounds after eight seconds, the rider touches the animal, himself or his equipment with his free hand; if either foot slips out of a stirrup; if he drops the bronc rein; if he fails to have his feet in the proper “mark out” position at the beginning of the ride; or he bucks off.
Steer Wrestling

Steer Wrestling

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Steer Wrestling

Wrestling a steer requires more than brute strength. The successful steer wrestler, or bulldogger, is strong to be sure, but he also understands the principles of leverage. The steer wrestler on horseback starts behind a barrier, and begins his chase after the steer has been given a head start. If the bulldogger leaves too soon and breaks the barrier, he receives a 10 second penalty. The steer wrestler is assisted by a hazer, another cowboy on horseback tasked with keeping the steer running in a straight line. When the bull dogger’s horse pulls even with the steer, he eases down the right side of the horse and reaches for the steer’s horns and pushes down with his left hand in a effort to tip the steer over. After the catch by the horns, the steer wrestler must either bring the steer to a stop or change the direction of the animal’s body before the throw or he is disqualified. The clock stops when the steer is on his side with all four legs pointing the same direction.

Bull Riding

Unlike the other rough stock contestants, bull riders are not required to spur with their feet. No wonder… It’s usually impressive enough just to remain seated for eight seconds on an animal that may weigh more than a ton and is as quick as he is big. Upper body control and strong legs are cowboy essential to riding bulls. The rider tries to remain forward “over his hand” at all times. Leaning back could cause him to be whipped forward when the bull bucks. Judges watch for good body position and other factors, including use of the free arm and spurring action. Although not required, spurring will add points to a rider’s score. As in all the riding events, half of the score in bull riding is determined by the contestant’s performance and the other half is based on the animal’s effort. A bull rider will be disqualified for touching the animal, himself or his equipment with his free hand or bucking off.

Team Roping

Team roping is unique in that two cowboys work together for a shared time. The first cowboy, known as the “header”, ropes the steer either by the horns, around the steer’s neck, or “half head” which is roping one horn and the neck. After this catch is made, the header wraps his rope around the saddle horn, commonly known as dallying, and turns the steer in a wide arc to the left. The second cowboy is known as the “heeler”. He trails along beside the steer until the header turns the steer to the left, then moves in behind the steer and attempts to rope the both of the steer’s back feet. If he only manages to rope one hind foot, the team receives a five-second penalty. The time is stopped when both cowboys horses are facing each other.
Barrel Racing

Barrel Racing

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Barrel Racing

In barrel racing, the contestant and her horse enter the arena at full speed. As they start the pre-set pattern of three barrels, the horse and rider trigger an electronic eye that starts the clock ticking… dirt flies and hearts pound as rider and horse race against the clock. The racer rides a cloverleaf pattern around the three barrels strategically positioned in the arena, and then the pair sprint back out of the arena at full speed, once again tripping the electronic eye and stopping the clock as the Barrel Racer leaves. The contestant and her horse can touch or even move the barrels, but the racer receives a five second penalty for each barrel that is actually overturned. With the margin of victory measured in hundredths of seconds, knocking over one barrel spells disaster.
Mutton Bustin'

Mutton Bustin'

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Mutton Bustin'

Mutton busting is an event held at rodeos similar to bull riding or bronc riding, in which children ride or race sheep.[1In the event, a sheep is held still, either in a small chute or by an adult handler while a child is placed on top in a riding position. Once the child is seated atop the sheep, the sheep is released and usually starts to run in an attempt to get the child off. Often small prizes or ribbons are given out to the children who can stay on the longest. There are no set rules for mutton busting, no national organization, and most events are organized at the local level.[2]
Rodeo Clowns

Rodeo Clowns

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Rodeo Clowns

The primary job of the rodeo clown (aka bullfighter) is to protect a fallen rider from the bull by distracting the bull and providing an alternative target for the bull to attack, whether the rider has been bucked off or has jumped off the animal. Clowns also provide comic relief.
Why Cowboys and Cowgirls Compete

Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association PRCA Rodeo contestants compete in multiple rodeos throughout the annual rodeo season to earn performance points to qualify for a contestant berth at the state level Finals rodeo, such as the California Finals Rodeo  and to ultimately be invited to compete at the National Finals Rodeo .

Links to referenced rodeo websites:
www.cafinalsrodeo.com
www.prorodeo.com
www.wpra.com

Patriotic Performances by:

Brenna Brean

Brenna Brean

Performing the National Anthem Friday May 19th

Brenna Brean is a soprano classical vocalist who is currently working towards her Bachelors Degree in Vocal Performance at Grossmont College and was a member of the Grossmont Master Chorale from 2014 to 2016. She was most recently a member of the 2017 American Young Adult Honors Choir Performance at Carnegie Hall in New York. She currently sings as a soloist around the San Diego Community including graduations, fund raising ceremonies, local wineries, weddings and funerals. She sings the National Anthem at many events which she feels is quite an honor. She started singing in fourth grade at Mt. Woodson Elementary School where she received her first solo performance. She continued to sing as a soloist and in choirs. She was a member of the Ramona High School Concert Choir, Madrigal Choir, and was President of the Ramona High Chamber Choir. She was a member of the American High School Honors Performance Series Honors Choir at Carnegie Hall in 2012, 2013, and 2014. “Music is my life passion and I love sharing it with others.”

Retired Marine Sgt. Major and Vietnam War veteran Bill Paxton

Reciting a patriotic poem titled, “It’s Our Flag”, written by Marine Lance Cpl. Bud Hannings

Bill Paxton knew he wanted to be a Marine the day his family buried his dad, a Marine who had been killed while fighting the Japanese during the Pacific campaign of World War II. His drill instructor in boot camp had a significant impact on him and would later be the focus of the movie “The DI.” His early years in the marines formed the basis for his successful career; he twice served as a drill instructor and had two tours of duty in Vietnam as a grunt. His impact on all who he came in contact with was evident in the drive that pushed Ken Norton, his former recruit, to become the Boxing Heavyweight Champion of the World. Paxton received the Bronze Star for heroic actions in Vietnam and was also awarded several Purple Heart Medals for wounds he sustained in battle. Having achieved the rank of Sergeant Major, he retired from active duty after thirty years; still, he proudly says, “Retired, but still active!” He has become an icon in the Marines and is one of the most well-known Marines in the San Diego area.

Retired Marine Sgt. Major and Vietnam War veteran Bill Paxton
Amy Scruggs

Amy Scruggs

Performing the National Anthem Saturday May 20th

Raised in San Dimas, California, Amy has been singing since the age of three. Mother of 4, she finally lived out her dream that has always been rooted in country music. While in Nashville, Amy caught the attention of many industry professionals for her powerful vocals and passion for supporting our troops. Amy was featured in the July 2009 issue of Country Weekly Magazine as well as the September 2009 cover story for Nashville Music Guide. Her contagious spirit and her passion resonate to all who hear her. Amy’s Patriotism shines through in her known traditional version of the National Anthem.

Madison Deskovick

Performing the National Anthem Sunday May 21st

Honeycutt Rodeo Company